Consultants Program will be run on Friday 20th September 2019 from 9.30am

CONSULTANT PROGRAM PRICE LIST:

QAA QUALIFIED MEMBER$185.00
QAA GENERAL MEMBER$225.00
NON-MEMBER$255.00

Includes site entry for 3 days to ArborCamp™

For accommodation and kids program booking, please ensure you add these options to your cart when placing your bookings.

CLICK HERE TO BOOK

PRESENTERS INCLUDE:

Matthew Daniels 
Global Urban Forest

Discussion on Tree Health & Soil Health relationships

Mathew Daniel is a leading internationally experienced Plant Health Care Arborist. With a demonstrated history of working in the environmental services industry and skilled in Soil and Plant Science, Sustainable Development, Advanced Compost Production, Natural Resource Management, and Environmental Awareness, Matthew is leading a developing Plant Health Care Industry.

Matthew has a diverse background with Arboriculture roots. A scholarship arborist of 23 years, with 3 years of PHC experience in Boston, USA. and over a decade of developing soil and plant health methodology based on measurable parameters and specialising in soil microbiology, Matthew is now working collaboratively on international research projects with colleagues at Michigan State University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Matthew can deliver a detailed and practical working adaptation of the essential relationship between soil health and plant health and the application of new state of the art environmental sensors and web-based platforms.

Come listen to Matthew and learn about the new – Swinburne Uni  – School of Plant/ Soil Health and Environmental Sensing Technologies and talk about some of his latest projects, at this year’s QAA Arbor Camp!

Optimal tree and soil health can be achieved by applying a unique data collection method and approach in order to understand soil health parameters that are fundamental to plant health.

By approaching environmental assessment through a process of measuring complex plant and soil relationships between photosynthesis, soil biology, chemistry and physical structure a more accurate and sustainable understanding and management of natural assets can be achieved.

Armed with an elaborate collection of site sourced laboratory information, and environmental measures and sensor data, Matthew can develop remediation and maintenance programs based on natural processes to reduce decline and return the plant to an optimum level of vigor.

 


 

Janet McDonald 
Forest Health Surveillance, Forest Production & Protection Horticulture & Forestry Science

Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

Janet will be presenting her Pest and Disease Damage & Symptom Recognition Workshop. 

**Attendees will receive copies of Booklets: Forest Health Surveillance Damage Recognition & Forest Health Surveillance Collection Techniques.

Janet McDonald has been working with the Department of Agriculture, Forest Health Surveillance (FHS) team since 1998 conducting pests and disease surveys in forestry plantations throughout Queensland. Janet was part of the team of researchers who set up FHS systems in the South Pacific Islands and most recently in south-east Asia. She was responsible for establishing FHS systems in the sandalwood plantations in the Ord River Irrigation Area near Kununurra WA. After twenty years of experience conducting pest and disease surveys and collecting samples in the field, Janet is now looking forward to sharing her knowledge with industry professionals.

“Quite often the agent causing the problem will have been and gone but it’s the symptoms they leave behind that are important.”
“Damage to a tree can be occurring underground but the symptoms are showing above ground. You just need to know how to recognise them”.
“Simple techniques can be used in the field, for example, knowing the difference between chlorosis caused by toxicity or nutritional disorder”.

Types of damage:
Leaf chewing
Gall-forming – insect & fungal
Sap-sucking
Leaf tying
Stem/branch boring
Leaf pathogens
Cankers
Root pathogens
Nutritional disorders
Exotic/biosecurity agents

Field identification – “Some types of damage are specific to a particular agent which makes the problem identifiable in the field”

Field sample collection techniques and photography – “You could have the best sample in the field but if it’s not collected correctly it’s useless for identification”

Field equipment hygiene – “It’s important to practice field hygiene so that you’re not spreading the problem”